Classes

ART 100 SYLLABUS


Mary Andersen
Adjunct Professor of Art and Art History
Ohlone College

mandersen@ohlone.edu

I have a mailbox, but no office.  The best way to contact me is by email, before or after class, or by leaving a note in my box.

Big Tip:  To do well in this section you need to take good notes.  If you miss a class be sure and ask a classmate about what we covered because the quiz at the end of the Art section is cumulative and specific.  The vocabulary words at the end of this syllabus will be of help.

TENTATIVE ART SCHEDULE

Jan 24: General Introduction, Fieldtrips, Extra Credit

Jan 26: Learning to Look (Intro, Media)

Feb 7:  Learning to Look (Composition, Line, Shape, Texture)

Feb 9:  Learning to Look (Space & Value)

Feb 14: Finish Formal Analysis & Begin Looking to Learn (Color, Iconographic Analysis)

Feb 16: Looking to Learn and Modern Art: Contextual Analysis, Is it Art?, Modern Art

Feb 23: Modern Art: Van Gogh (Paper/Inner Portrait Due)

Feb 28: Modern Art: Van Gogh discussion, Picasso & CLASS CAB TEST  REVIEW

March 2:  Art Quiz

May 9:  Art of the Sixties (Art Extra Credit Due)

May 16: Final Quiz

CLASSROOM CONDUCT

IF YOU COPY OR QUOTE SOMEONE WITHOUT A CITATION YOU WILL FAIL THE ENTIRE CLASS

Please turn off all cell phones and  remove your earphones.

Please do not come in late.

Do not talk when I am talking.

If you cannot hear a response, raise your hand and ask for it to be repeated. I know that I tend to go on sometimes; feel free to raise your hand and ask questions at any time.  If I’m really on a roll, you might have to yell.

I will generally give you a break around 45 minutes into the class.  Please return.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY 
All the work on your assignments must be in your own words.  You may not copy from the book, glossary, encyclopedia, the internet or another student.

Academic dishonesty defrauds all those who depend upon the integrity of the College, its courses, and its degree and certificates.  Students are expected to follow the ethical standards required in Ohlone courses.  These Standards are defined in the Policy on Academic Dishonesty .  Violations of this policy include cheating and plagiarism.  (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans.)

7.8.4.1 Definitions of Academic Dishonesty  (for further information visithttp://www.ohlone.cc.ca.us/org/board/policy/Chapter7Reg.htm#7.8.2)

A. Cheating 
At Ohlone, cheating is the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Cheating at Ohlone includes but is not limited to the following: 
1. Copying, in part or in whole, from another’s test or other evaluation instrument or obtaining answers from another person during the test; 
2. Submitting work previously presented in another course, if contrary to the rules of either course; 
3. Using or consulting during an examination sources or materials not authorized by the instructor; 
4. Altering or interfering with grading or grading instructions; 
5. Sitting for an examination by a surrogate, or as a surrogate; 
6. Any other act committed by a student in the course of his or her academic work which defrauds or misrepresents, including aiding or abetting in any of the actions defined above.

B. Plagiarism 
At Ohlone, plagiarism is the act of representing the work of another as one’s own (without giving appropriate credit) regardless of how that work was obtained and submitting it to fulfill academic requirements. Plagiarism at Ohlone includes but is not limited to 
1. The act of incorporating the ideas, words, sentences, paragraphs, or parts thereof, or the specific substance of another’s work, without giving appropriate credit, and representing the product as one’s own work; and 
2. Representing another’s artistic/scholarly works such as musical compositions, computer programs, photographs, paintings, drawings, sculptures, or similar works as one’s own.

STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT 
The student has the right and shares the responsibility to exercise the freedom to learn. The student is expected to conduct himself/herself in accordance with standards of the college that are designed to perpetuate its educational purposes.  These procedures, along with applicable penalties for violation, are found in the Standards of Student Conduct and Discipline and Due Process Procedures. (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans).

GRADING
Your Art grade is  one third of your total grade.  It is based on:

  1. Museum Review (25 points)
  2. “Inner Person” Portrait (25 points)
  3. Art Quiz (50 points)

PLEASE NOTE:
Without advance notice to the instructor there will be NO MAKEUP QUIZ (and you will fail).
You may raise your Art grade by turning in acceptable extra credit.

MUSEUM REVIEW

Your review is due in about a month.  Plan accordingly.

There is no substitute for the real thing, and the real thing is at a museum.  Plan ahead; many of the museums have free or discount days, and many are closed on strange days, so take a look at their websites ahead of time. Every semester I have students tell me that they drove to San Francisco on Wednesday, and MOMA was closed.

I have been brought to tears by art.  I have also been confused, indignant and just plain irritated by art.  As old as I am, it still surprises me, so I don’t expect you to stand before an artist’s vision and get the whole thing.  In fact, as an artist, I know that the maker of the art didn’t even get the whole thing.  I do expect you to try, however, and this class should give you the tools you need to write an interesting and thoughtful paper.

This is what I want:

A typed, one to two page double spaced college-quality paper (introductory and concluding paragraph, no grammatical or spelling errors). Support your statements and use vocabulary and concepts discussed in class. Do not just answer my questions, make it a real paper.

Choose ONE of these topics, or talk to me about your own idea (sometimes an artist provokes a specific response):

1.      Choose an exhibition and explain why you chose this particular show.  Why did it catch your eye?  What was the artist trying to do?  Did she succeed?  What did you learn?  Would you recommend it?  If you saw a “big name” why do you think the artist is so popular?  Is it merited?  Be sure and include background on the artist to support your statements.

2.      Choose your favorite and least favorite art piece at the museum.  Explain your choices using the tools you have learned to use in class.  What grabbed you in the one you like? What’s wrong with the piece you don’t like?  Why do you think they spent so much money acquiring this piece? (Somebody must have liked it).   Remember to support your opinions.

IMPORTANT:  Convince me of what you believe!  Use specific examples from the work you’ve seen and vocabulary from class to support your statements.

Here are some local museums to try:

Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (SFMOMA)
www.sfmoma.org
151 Third Street (between Mission and Howard Streets
San Francisco, CA  94103
415.357.4037

Free First Tuesday of the month

BART:   Stop: Montgomery St. Station.

Driving:  Take interstate 80 and exit at Fremont St.  Take an immediate left from Fremont onto Howard St. and get into the right lane.  Go 2 blocks and turn right onto Third St.  Parking is available at the SFMOMA garage on Minna between Third and New Montgomery Streets, behind the Museum. Call 415.348.0971 for more info.

Cantor Museum of Art (Palo Alto)
www.museum.stanford.edu

De Young Museum (San Francisco)
www.famsf.org

Legion of Honor (San Francisco)
www.famsf.org

San Jose Museum of Art
www.sjmusart.org

Oakland Museum (Fine Art Section Only)
www.museumca.org

“INNER PERSON” PORTRAIT

Think of someone you know very well, then do his portrait.  It needn’t look like the person at all; what I’m interested in is a picture of the “inner person.”  You can use almost anything (computer, stamps, magazines, stencils, paper, paint, pencil, photos, etc).  You don’t necessarily need to depict the human form at all, but you do need to graphically explain that person’s personality.  Don’t make it too large or loose to grade and please include your name and a short paragraph explaining what you were going for.

You can find a few examples here.  Give yourself time to do a thoughtful job on this project and I think you will enjoy it.

ART QUIZ

The Art Quiz consists of 25 multiple choice questions.  Please bring a scantron sheet and pencil.  You may leave after you are finished.  Be sure and take good notes during my lectures.  Although there are a great many images on the website, they will not be much help to you if you haven’t written down what I said about them.  To help you review the material we will play “Class Cab” before the Quiz.

EXTRA CREDIT

You may raise your grade by turning in acceptable extra credit.  For each well-written paper you will receive up to 5 points and you may do up to four.  You may email it to me or put it in my mailbox.  If you put it in my mailbox please let me know so that I can check for it. Although you may send it to me any time, the last day I will accept it is May 9.

1.     See a show at the Ohlone Gallery and write a review using the tools we have learned to use in class (formal, iconographic, contextual analysis).   It should be one to two pages in length with an introductory and concluding paragraph.  Use examples from the show to support your ideas.

2.     Research two artists, then imagine a “Showdown” between them.  For example: Picasso vs Van Gogh – who was the greatest artist of all time?   Support both sides in an over the top “promotional” manner.  Be sure and use concrete examples to support your opinions.

3.       Watch a movie about an artist and review it.  You may choose from:  Lust for Life, Pollock, Frida, Basquiat or Exit Through the Gift Shop.  It should be one to two pages in length with an introductory and concluding paragraph.  Rather than reprising the plot, discuss what motivated and influenced the artist.  Think about the following questions:  Do you like his art?  Is it well done? Was he successful?  Was he sincere or an opportunist?  Why is the artist so popular?  Would he have been so famous had he lived a long life?  What do you think of the myth of the tortured artist?  What do you think about “artist as celebrity?” What do people want from art? Do they get it?   Use examples from the film to support your ideas and don’t just answer my questions, write a real paper.

Art Vocabulary

Knowing these words will help you pass your quizzes, talk about art, and write your paper.  They roughly follow the lectures:

Formal Analysis: Analyzing only what you see in an art piece:  medium, composition, and visual elements.

Medium: What an art piece is made out of.

Composition: The arrangement of visual elements in a work of art.

Visual Elements:  Usually defined as line, shape, texture, space, value,  and color.

Line: A mark left by a moving point, actual or implied, and varying in direction, thickness and density.

Shape:  The form of an object or figure.

Space:  This is what contains objects.

Mass:  Matter that takes up space.

Volume: Enclosed or defined space.

Form: The literal shape and mass of an object or figure.

Value:  The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Texture: The tactile quality of a surface.

Color: A visual element that includes three properties:  hue, value and saturation or intensity.

Iconographic Analysis:  Analyzing symbols in an art piece.

Contextual Analysis:  Analyzing the background of an art piece.

Symmetry: Term used when two halves of a composition correspond to one another.

Symmetrical balance:  Term used when two halves of a composition corresponds in size, shape and placement of forms.

Asymmetrical balance: Balance achieved in a composition when neither side reflects or mirrors the other.

Repetition: Repeating elements.  Used for emphasis.

Emphasis or Focal Point: The center of visual attention.

Linear Perspective: A system for depicting 3 D space on a 2 D surface that is based on the principle that if your picture follows parallel lines receding into the distance and converging at a vanishing point on the horizon line your work will look 3D.

Vanishing Point:  In linear perspective, the point on the horizon line where parallel lines appear to converge.

Foreshortening:  Modification of perspective to decrease distortion resulting from the apparent visual contraction of an object or figure as it extends backwards from the picture plane at an angle approaching the perpendicular.

Atmospheric or Aerial perspective: A system for depicting 3 D space on a 2 D surface.  It is based on the principle that objects distant from the viewer are less distinct, bluer or cooler.

Chiaroscuro:  Using light and dark to create the effect of a three dimensional, modeled surface.

Modeling: Using light and dark to create the effect of a three dimensional, modeled surface.

Intuitive perspective:  A nonscientific approach to perspective.

Overlap: Using overlap to create the illusion of space.

Scale & proportion:  The comparative size of one thing to another, or between parts of a whole.

Sfumato:  Smoky edges; used for modeling and perspective.

Value: The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Key: The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Tenebrism: Using light as a spotlighting effect in a murky or dark scene.

Trompe l’oeil: A painting style so realistic that it “fools the eye.”

Hue: The name of a color.  For example, red, yellow, blue

Intensity: Brightness or purity of color.  Saturation.

Non-local color: Color used for effect; it doesn’t belong there naturally. It’s from “out of town.”

Analogous Colors: Colors next to each other on the color wheel.

Optical Mixing: Spots or dots of pure hues set beside each other and mixed by the viewer’s eye.

Pointillism: Using lots of little dots in a painting. These blend when stepping back.

Memento Mori:  A reminder that life is fleeting.  In Latin it means  “remember you must die.”

Vanitas: A kind of still life painting designed to remind us of the vanity, or frivolous quality of human existence.

Raft of the Medusa:  Painting by Theodore Gericault dramatically depicting survivors of the ship Medusa.  This event revealed widespread government corruption in France.

Guernica: Painting by Pablo Picasso dramatically depicting the bombing of Guernica in the Spanish Civil War.

Van Gogh:  Postimpressionist.  The emotion, color, texture man.

Gauguin: Postimpressionist.  The dreamy, color, symbolist man.

Picasso: Modern.  The style changing man.

Matisse:  Modern.  The happy color man.

Expressionism: Art that stresses psychological and emotional content.

Symbolism: Art that has to with dreams, imagination and myth.

Dada:  An art movement that celebrates nonsense.

Surrealism: A style of art that emphasizes dreams, chance, and the unconscious mind.

Abstract: Rendering images in a stylized or simplified way so that their formal or expressive aspects are emphasized.  You usually can’t recognize concrete forms in it.

Abstract Expressionism: Art from the 40s and 50s emphasizing expressive content by nonobjective means (Jackson Pollock).  It’s usually very energetic.

Pop Art:  Style arising in the early 1960s characterized by its emphasis on the forms and imagery of mass culture.

Performance Art: The artist IS the art.

STOP! The next section has to do with Art 101

ART 101 SYLLABUS

Mary Andersen

Adjunct Professor of Art and Art History

Ohlone College

mandersen@ohlone.edu

I have a mailbox, but no office.  The best way to contact me is by email, before or after class, or by leaving a note in my box.

Big Tip:  To do well in this class you need to take good notes.  If you miss a class be sure and ask a classmate about what we covered, or email me and I’ll clue you in.

CLASSROOM CONDUCT

IF YOU COPY OR QUOTE SOMEONE WITHOUT A CITATION YOU WILL FAIL THE ENTIRE CLASS

Please turn off all cell phones and  remove your earphones.

Please do not come in late.

Do not talk when I am talking.

If you cannot hear a response, raise your hand and ask for it to be repeated. Also, I tend to go on a bit sometimes.; feel free to raise your hand and ask questions any time.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY 
All the work on your assignments must be in your own words.  You may not copy from the book, glossary, encyclopedia, the internet or another student.

Academic dishonesty defrauds all those who depend upon the integrity of the College, its courses, and its degree and certificates.  Students are expected to follow the ethical standards required in Ohlone courses.  These Standards are defined in the Policy on Academic Dishonesty .  Violations of this policy include cheating and plagiarism.  (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans.)

7.8.4.1 Definitions of Academic Dishonesty  (for further information visit http://www.ohlone.cc.ca.us/org/board/policy/Chapter7Reg.htm#7.8.2)

A. Cheating 
At Ohlone, cheating is the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Cheating at Ohlone includes but is not limited to the following: 
1. Copying, in part or in whole, from another’s test or other evaluation instrument or obtaining answers from another person during the test; 
2. Submitting work previously presented in another course, if contrary to the rules of either course; 
3. Using or consulting during an examination sources or materials not authorized by the instructor; 
4. Altering or interfering with grading or grading instructions; 
5. Sitting for an examination by a surrogate, or as a surrogate; 
6. Any other act committed by a student in the course of his or her academic work which defrauds or misrepresents, including aiding or abetting in any of the actions defined above.

B. Plagiarism 
At Ohlone, plagiarism is the act of representing the work of another as one’s own (without giving appropriate credit) regardless of how that work was obtained and submitting it to fulfill academic requirements. Plagiarism at Ohlone includes but is not limited to 
1. The act of incorporating the ideas, words, sentences, paragraphs, or parts thereof, or the specific substance of another’s work, without giving appropriate credit, and representing the product as one’s own work; and 
2. Representing another’s artistic/scholarly works such as musical compositions, computer programs, photographs, paintings, drawings, sculptures, or similar works as one’s own.

STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT 
The student has the right and shares the responsibility to exercise the freedom to learn. The student is expected to conduct himself/herself in accordance with standards of the college that are designed to perpetuate its educational purposes.  These procedures, along with applicable penalties for violation, are found in the Standards of Student Conduct and Discipline and Due Process Procedures. (Copies of this policy are available in the offices of the Vice President, Educational Services/Deputy Superintendent; or Division Deans.).

TENTATIVE ART 101 SCHEDULE

Section 1:  Learning to Look (Formal, Iconographic & Contextual Analysis)

Week 1: Intro & Formal Analysis

  • Class 1  Intro & Talking About Art
  • Class 2   Visual Elements: Composition

Week 2:  Formal Analysis

  • Class 3  Visual Elements: Line, Shape, Texture
  • Class 4  Visual Elements: Space (Perspective)

Week 3:  Formal Analysis

  • Lucky!  Holiday
  • Class 5  Visual Elements:  Value/Color

Week 4:  Wrap Up

  • Class 6  Last Visual Element:  Color & Iconographic Analysis
  • Class 7  Contextual Analysis & Review (Class Cab)

Week 5:  Quiz & Art All Over

  • Class 8 Quiz on Section 1: Formal, Iconographic & Contextual Analysis

Section 2:   Art All Over

  • Class 9  Space:  Video: Alexander Calder

Week 6: Space

  • Class 10  Space:  Cai Guo Qiang
  • Class 11  Space:  Video: Bernini

Week 7:  Film

  • Class 12  Elements of Film & Background of On The Waterfront
  • Class 13  Don’t be late!  Movie:  On The Waterfront

Week 8: Wrap Up

  • Class 14  Discussion & Review (Class Cab)
  • Class 15  Quiz on Section 2: Art All Over

Spring Break:  No Class Mar 29 & 31

Section 3:   Modern Art

Week 8:  Beginnings

  • Class 16   Modern Art Begins
  • Class 17  Video:  Vincent Van Gogh

Week 9:  The Shock of the New

  • Class 18  Discussion & Symbolist Art
  • Class 19  Picasso

Week 10:  Still Shocking

  • Class 20  Matisse & Review (Class Cab)
  • Class 21  Quiz:  Modern Art Through Matisse

Week 11:  Crazy Good

  • Class 21  Be a Modern Master & Expressionism
  • Class 22   Armory Show & Dada

Week 12:  Some “isms” & Ab Ex

  • Class 23  Surrealism & Realism
  • Class 24  Abstract Expressionism:  Pollock & Friends

Week 13:  Color Field Painting & Pop Art

  • Class 25 Video: Mark Rothko
  • Class 26  Discussion & Pop Art  Museum Review Due

Week 14:  Rauschenberg & Wrap Up.

  • Class 27      Video:  Rauschenberg
  • Class 28      Discussion and review (Class Cab)  Extra Credit Due

Week 15:  Final: Only on Surrealism to Now

GRADING

Your Art 101 Grade is based on:

  • Participation (10%)
  • Quiz: Formal, Iconographic & Contextual Analysis (20%)
  • Quiz: Art All Over (20%)
  • Quiz: Modern Art to Matisse (20%)
  • Final:  Modern Art from Surrealists to Now (20%)
  • Museum Review (10%)

Quizzes  & final will be on scantron sheets.  Please bring scantron & pencil to class.  You may leave after completing the test.

Without advance notice to the instructor there will be NO makeup quizzes.

MUSEUM REVIEW

Read All Instructions Carefully!

You may visit any of the following museums on your own, then write a review of what you saw using the guidelines provided.

Plan ahead; many of the museums have free or discount days.

Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (SFMOMA)

www.sfmoma.org

151 Third Street (between Mission and Howard Streets)

San Francisco, CA  94103

415.357.4037

Free First Tuesday of the month

BART:   Stop: Montgomery St. Station.

Driving:  Take interstate 80 and exit at Fremont St.  Take an immediate left from Fremont onto Howard St. and get into the right lane.  Go 2 blocks and turn right onto Third St.  Parking is available at the SFMOMA garage on Minna between Third and New Montgomery Streets, behind the Museum. Call 415.348.0971 for more info.

Cantor Museum of Art (Palo Alto)

www.museum.stanford.edu

De Young Museum (San Francisco)

www.famsf.org

Legion of Honor (San Francisco)

www.famsf.org

San Jose Museum of Art

www.sjmusart.org

Oakland Museum (Fine Art Section Only)

www.museumca.org

Your museum ticket or other evidence of attendance MUST be stapled to your paper.

Choose ONE of the following topics and write at least a two page typed double spaced paper on that particular topic.  You should have an introductory paragraph as well as a concluding paragraph and it should be free of grammatical and spelling errors.  Support your statements and make sure to address formal, iconographic and contextual analysis when discussing the art.  The vocabulary at the end of this section will be of help to you.

Topics:

1.      Choose an exhibition and explain why you chose this particular show.  Why did it catch your eye?  What was the artist trying to do?  Did she succeed?  What did you learn?  Would you recommend it?  If you saw a “big name” why do you think the artist is so popular?  Is it merited?  Be sure and include background on the artist to support your statements.

2.      Choose your favorite and least favorite art piece at the museum.  Explain your choices using the tools you have learned to use in class.  What grabbed you in the one you like? What’s wrong with the piece you don’t like?  Why do you think they spent so much money acquiring this piece? (Somebody must have liked it).   Remember to support your opinions.

IMPORTANT:  Convince me of what you believe!  Use specific examples from the work you’ve seen and vocabulary from class to support your statements.

EXTRA CREDIT

You may raise your grade by turning in acceptable extra credit.  For each well-written paper you will receive up to 5 points.  You may email it to me or put it in my mailbox.  If you put it in my mailbox please let me know so that I can check for it.

1.     See a show at the Ohlone Gallery and write a review using the tools we have learned to use in class (formal, iconographic, contextual analysis).   It should be one to two pages in length with an introductory and concluding paragraph.  Use examples from the show to support your ideas.

2.     Research two artists, then imagine a “Showdown” between them.  For example: Picasso vs Van Gogh – who was the greatest artist of all time?   Support both sides in an over the top “promotional” manner.  Be sure and use concrete examples to support your opinions.

3.       Watch a movie about an artist and review it.  You may choose from:  Lust for Life, Pollock, Frida, or Basquiat.  It should be one to two pages in length with an introductory and concluding paragraph.  Rather than reprising the plot, discuss what motivated and influenced the artist.  Think about the following questions:  Do you like his art?  Is it well done? Was he successful?  Was he sincere or an opportunist?  Why is the artist so popular?  Would he have been so famous had he lived a long life?  What do you think of the myth of the tortured artist?  Use examples from the film to support your ideas.

Art Vocabulary

Knowing these words will help you pass your quizzes, talk about art, and write your paper.  They roughly follow the lectures:

Formal Analysis: Analyzing only what you see in an art piece:  medium, composition, and visual elements.

Medium: What an art piece is made out of.

Composition: The arrangement of visual elements in a work of art.

Visual Elements:  Usually defined as line, shape, texture, space, value,  and color.

Line: A mark left by a moving point, actual or implied, and varying in direction, thickness and density.

Shape:  The form of an object or figure.

Space:  This is what contains objects.

Mass:  Matter that takes up space.

Volume: Enclosed or defined space.

Form: The literal shape and mass of an object or figure.

Value:  The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Texture: The tactile quality of a surface.

Color: A visual element that includes three properties:  hue, value and saturation or intensity.

Iconographic Analysis:  Analyzing symbols in an art piece.

Contextual Analysis:  Analyzing the background of an art piece.

Symmetry: Term used when two halves of a composition correspond to one another.

Symmetrical balance:  Term used when two halves of a composition corresponds in size, shape and placement of forms.

Asymmetrical balance: Balance achieved in a composition when neither side reflects or mirrors the other.

Repetition: Repeating elements.  Used for emphasis.

Emphasis or Focal Point: The center of visual attention.

Linear Perspective: A system for depicting 3 D space on a 2 D surface that is based on the principle that if your picture follows parallel lines receding into the distance and converging at a vanishing point on the horizon line your work will look 3D.

Vanishing Point:  In linear perspective, the point on the horizon line where parallel lines appear to converge.

Foreshortening:  Modification of perspective to decrease distortion resulting from the apparent visual contraction of an object or figure as it extends backwards from the picture plane at an angle approaching the perpendicular.

Atmospheric or Aerial perspective: A system for depicting 3 D space on a 2 D surface.  It is based on the principle that objects distant from the viewer are less distinct, bluer or cooler.

Chiaroscuro:  Using light and dark to create the effect of a three dimensional, modeled surface.

Modeling: Using light and dark to create the effect of a three dimensional, modeled surface.

Intuitive perspective:  A nonscientific approach to perspective.

Overlap: Using overlap to create the illusion of space.

Scale & proportion:  The comparative size of one thing to another, or between parts of a whole.

Sfumato:  Smoky edges; used for modeling and perspective.

Value: The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Key: The relative lightness or darkness of a picture or the colors used in it.

Tenebrism: Using light as a spotlighting effect in a murky or dark scene.

Trompe l’oeil: A painting style so realistic that it “fools the eye.”

Hue: The name of a color.  For example, red, yellow, blue

Intensity: Brightness or purity of color.  Saturation.

Non-local color: Color used for effect; it doesn’t belong there naturally. It’s from “out of town.”

Analogous Colors: Colors next to each other on the color wheel.

Optical Mixing: Spots or dots of pure hues set beside each other and mixed by the viewer’s eye.

Pointillism: Using lots of little dots in a painting. These blend when stepping back.

Memento Mori:  A reminder that life is fleeting.  In Latin it means  “remember you must die.”

Vanitas: A kind of still life painting designed to remind us of the vanity, or frivolous quality of human existence.

Raft of the Medusa:  Painting by Theodore Gericault dramatically depicting survivors of the ship Medusa.  This event revealed widespread government corruption in France.

Guernica: Painting by Pablo Picasso dramatically depicting the bombing of Guernica in the Spanish Civil War.

Van Gogh:  Postimpressionist.  The emotion, color, texture man.

Gauguin: Postimpressionist.  The dreamy, color, symbolist man.

Picasso: Modern.  The style changing man.

Matisse:  Modern.  The happy color man.

Expressionism: Art that stresses psychological and emotional content.

Symbolism: Art that has to with dreams, imagination and myth.

Dada:  An art movement that celebrates nonsense.

Surrealism: A style of art that emphasizes dreams, chance, and the unconscious mind.

Abstract: Rendering images in a stylized or simplified way so that their formal or expressive aspects are emphasized.  You usually can’t recognize concrete forms in it.

Abstract Expressionism: Art from the 40s and 50s emphasizing expressive content by nonobjective means (Jackson Pollock).  It’s usually very energetic.

Pop Art:  Style arising in the early 1960s characterized by its emphasis on the forms and imagery of mass culture.

Performance Art: The artist IS the art.

I would like to thank Professor Kenney Mencher for his invaluable assistance.

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